Cloudflare offers streaming video solution

Excerpt from: Cloudflare

Cloudflare turns seven years old today. We launched on September 27, 2010.

It was only a few days after our launch that we got our first request to support video streaming. Yet, until today, we’d avoided it.

Why? Simply put: the video streaming market is screwed up. While there’s a lot of money spent on video, there are only really about 1,000 customers that do any meaningful level of streaming.

This is in large part because it’s technically far too complicated. If you want to move beyond just uploading your videos to a consumer service like YouTube, then you have to use at least three different services. You need someone to encode your video into a streamable format, you need someone else to act as the content delivery network delivering the bytes, and you need someone else still to provide the player code that runs on the client device. Further, since video encoding standards keep evolving and vary across generations of devices, it becomes challenging to ensure a consistently high quality experience for all visitors.

And if that sounds like a technical mess, the business side is even worse. Encoding companies charge based on CPU usage, which is driven by the length and quality of the video and the number of streaming formats it’s converted into. Traditional CDNs then charge different rates for each region of the world based on the number of bytes delivered. Finally, player vendors charge at tiered levels based on the number of views.

Read more at: https://blog.cloudflare.com/introducing-cloudflare-stream/

Facebook paid to have first-rights to series

Two companies said they were paid between $10,000 to $25,000 per episode for their shows. They’ll also receive 55 percent of the ad revenue while Facebook takes the rest.

In a move that could be seen as a direct competitive move to YouTube, paid series have to debut episodes on Facebook, according to the publishers. However, they are allowed to move episodes off-platform to their own owned-and-operated players or YouTube after a certain period of time. Though Facebook was encouraging publishers to use their player off-site, the goal is to get as many people watching Facebook shows on Facebook itself, multiple sources said.

Facebook has just made a case to increase the cost of advertising on the Internet. In a brazen move the corporate behemoth started paying content creators for a limited time license to their content. In a statement

If Facebook succeeds in getting more people to watch its original series on its platform, it could help the company solve a major issue they are facing: Having too many ads. The company has acknowledged its NewsFeed is growing overstuffed with ads. If people watch shows, they’ll be spending more time on Facebook. That would allow the company to charge more for ads because users are more engaged, without having to increase the number of ads on the platform.

The Internet moves quickly.

It’s time to position.

Disney and Facebook Make Headlines in Internet Television

Disney has decided to build its own streaming platform and pulls its content from Netflix. Meanwhile, Facebook has been quietly making deals with big broadcasters such as Major League Baseball and has started to test its YouTube contender called Watch.

Read more about the Disney story at: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/08/disney-will-pull-its-movies-from-netflix-and-start-its-own-streaming-services.html
Read more about the Facebook story at: https://www.cnbc.com/2017/08/09/facebook-announces-watch-youtube-competitor.html

What is notTV?

What is notTV?NotTV-Logo-White_512x165

notTV is a grassroots project. It’s a contemporary, dynamic media streaming platform designed within a cooperative framework. This platform is exciting and offers a unique experience for viewers, sponsors of products and services, and content creators.

The development of notTV has been a slow and steady journey. The initial exposure will start in the form of NotNow.tv: a regularly released web series, and notRadio, a podcast with lively, entertaining and informed discussions and interviews covering topics and people from various segments of society. NotNow.tv is a tool to bring people together in our new Internet economy. It is an unprecedented beacon to guide people and encourage us to support and educate one another as we move forward into the future. NotNow.tv will generate optimism, joy and enthusiasm to help us come together at a grassroots level and build a better future.

Potential Media Merger in the U.S.

This is big news… notTV is re-inventing local television on a global scale, starting with Canada. Meanwhile, in the United States  small Cable Operators have grave concerns over a potential merger between Sinclair Broadcast Group and Tribune Media which would give Sinclair an alleged dominance over the local TV marketplace.

Image Courtesy: STEVE RUARK/AP/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK
Image Courtesy: STEVE RUARK/AP/REX/SHUTTERSTOCK

Here’s an excerpt of the article published on variety.com:

A coalition of TV and media industry entities is urging the FCC to reject Sinclair Broadcast Group’s proposed $3.9 billion acquisition of Tribune Media, arguing that the combination would give Sinclair a dangerous level of power over the local TV marketplace.

Read the story at:
http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/sinclair-tribune-merger-opponents-1202517399/

More than 150,000 Canadians “cut the cord” in just the last quarter

cord-cutter-hero
Image Courtesy: Techspot.com, Shuttersotck, Legion of Decency

In 2015, nearly 200,000 Canadians ditched cable television. That’s a huge increase from 2014, when barely 100,000 cut the cord.

It’s not that Canadians have stopped using phones or watching TV, of course. Instead we’re relying on smartphones and streaming content on alternative platforms, such as Netflix.

In fact, Netflix is largely responsible for the death of cable TV in Canada. Half of Canadians have tried out an alternative video service recently, according to the J.D. Power 2016 Canadian Television Provider Customer TV/ISP Satisfaction Study. 67% used Netflix, while just 16% tried Shomi and only 9% streamed on CraveTV.

According to the study, the number of connected devices per household has risen to 9.9 from 4.5 in 2015.

Netflix’s Canadian library boasts nearly 4,000 titles and almost 20% of Canadians actively use the streaming service. During peak Internet usage hours, Netflix content can account for more than one-third of traffic in Canada.

by Knowlton Thomas

Source: Tech Vibes

Netflix Beats Live TV

Netflix vs TV
Image Courtesy: http://www.exorbeo.com/tv-menos-comerciais/

By Troy Dreier
Posted on May 19, 2016

We all know that Netflix is incredibly popular, but a survey reveals that watching a show on Netflix is twice as popular as watching a show on live TV.

That conclusion comes from E-Poll Market Research, which surveyed 1,488 U.S. consumers between the ages of 13 and 54, all of whom had watched a full-length streamed program in the last six months. When asked where they most frequently went when they wanted to watch a TV show the top answer was Netflix, the choice for 33 percent of those questioned. Watching a TV show at its broadcast time was selected by 16 percent, followed by DVR viewing at 15 percent. Hulu was the next highest subscription video-on-demand (SVOD) service with 7 percent.

Netflix viewing was dramatically higher for young adults age 18 to 24, 51 percent of whom would go there first. Only 7 percent of that group would watch a TV show at its broadcast time.

YouTube viewing was strongest for teens age 13 to 17, 17 percent of whom chose it, but even that group preferred Netflix for watching a TV show (39 percent).

E-Poll also asked streamers about their reasons for subscribing to an SVOD, and found that people chose Netflix for commercial-free viewing on their schedule, and also because it’s viewed as a good value. People chose Amazon Prime mostly to get free shipping.

Source: StreamingMedia.com

Netflix rolls out to 130 countries

Talk about a crowd pleaser… Netflix CEO Reed Hastings today said the streaming giant has deployed to another 130 countries, executing what he called “the birth of a new global TV network.” The crowd at his CES keynote, predictably, went wild. As expected, India and Russia were both part of the roll out and — again, as expected — China was not. At least for the moment. Hastings said Netflix would continue to explore options for deployment in the Middle Kingdom down the road. – See more at: http://www.ooyala.com/videomind/blog/netflix-launches-global-internet-tv-network